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Puritalia Berlinetta

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Bugatti Chiron Sport

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Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evoluzione II “Blu Lagos”

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Lamborghini Urus

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Ferrari F8 Tributo

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BMW 2002 (1972)

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Ford Introduces North America’s Largest EV Charging Network

Ford is giving future all-electric vehicle customers the confidence to enjoy a hassle-free electric lifestyle. By providing easy access to more electric vehicle public charging stations in North America than any other automaker, Ford will make it easier for customers to find a place to charge when the company starts delivering new models next year.

The Ford all-electric vehicle charging strategy features comprehensive at-home charging options and the nation’s largest network of public charging stations, including DC fast charging. And with both at-home and on-the-go charging powered by the FordPass app and in-vehicle screen, many customer hesitancies surrounding electric vehicle ownership are being addressed.

Among people who already own or want to purchase electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids, 48 percent say that a lack of charging stations is one of their main concerns,” said Ted Cannis, Ford director of global electrification. “By offering industry-leading charging access we are dismantling those barriers, allowing more customers to confidently enjoy the benefits of owning an electric vehicle.”

Ford has made EV home charging as easy as charging a smartphone, which is where most all-electric vehicle drivers currently charge.

Many Ford customers will choose an available Ford Connected Charge Station. Loaded with connectivity features, the higher powered 48-amp Ford Connected Charge Station enables full control no matter where customers are. It can fully power a vehicle overnight while they sleep, adding an estimated average range of 32 miles per charging hour. And it’s a great solution for those with longer commutes, customers who love connected features and for those who just want greater peace of mind.

Every Ford all-electric vehicle will come standard with a Ford Mobile Charger. It’s capable of charging on a higher-voltage 240-volt electrical outlet often used for large household appliances like a clothes dryer, which can add an estimated range of 22 miles per charging hour. Should customers ever need to use a standard 120-volt electrical outlet, that’s possible too and will result in an average range of three miles per charging hour.

To make life easier, Ford has teamed up with Amazon Home Services to offer installation of home charging setups. Whether Ford customers need a 240-volt outlet installed or you choose the Ford Connected Charge Station option, they will be able to see upfront pricing estimates and schedule a licensed and vetted electrician online.

On the road, Ford has worked hard to ensure a hassle-free charging experience. Ford is providing two years of complimentary access to North America’s largest network – the FordPass Charging Network – for easy and convenient pay-as-you-drive charging. The FordPass Charging Network includes more than 12,000 charging stations with more than 35,000 plugs, making public chargers as common as some of the most popular pharmacy or coffee chains.

Ford is working with Greenlots to bring together multiple charging providers to develop the FordPass Charging Network, making it easy for customers to find and pay for charging all through FordPass or their vehicle’s screen. Ford will work with Greenlots to explore adding additional networks to the FordPass Charging Network in the future for even further coverage.

In collaboration with Electrify America, the FordPass Charging Network will provide access to DC fast chargers, where charging an all-electric vehicle takes minutes, not hours. At a 150-kilowatt charger, customers can add an estimated 47 miles of range in 10 minutes and expect to return most of their vehicle’s charge in about the same time it takes them to grab a fast-casual meal.2

For longer trips, customers can charge their battery from 10 percent to 80 percent full charge in 45 minutes using an Electrify America DC fast charger.6

The fact that most of our customers will plug in at home is a key advantage to an all-electric vehicle,” said Matt Stover, Ford director of charging, energy services and business development. “We will deliver a charging experience that is hassle-free whether you’re at home or on-the-go.”

Ford will keep electric vehicle drivers fully connected whether charging at home or on the road through the FordPass app. Customers can set charging schedules and alerts at home and easily pre-condition their vehicle before they drive. While on the road, customers can be confident that Ford is providing the tools to help easily plan trips. A key feature within FordPass, and available through a vehicle’s on-screen dashboard, is FordPass Power My Trip, a tool that makes trip planning hassle-free by considering the vehicle’s current state of charge and identifying charging points along each route.

FordPass or the vehicle’s on-screen dashboard will tell a customer whether a charging outlet is available or in use (if data is made available by a charge point operator). FordPass will also identify points of interest – such as restaurants or shopping centers – to make the most of customers’ time while charging their vehicle on the go.

Whether poolside, tableside or bedside, customers can track their vehicle’s charging progress through the FordPass app, available at no extra cost through the Apple and Google Play stores for any Ford customer.

Ford is investing $11.5 billion in electrified vehicles through 2022 and is focused on the customer journey from end to end, including education ahead of purchase, and an easy shopping and ownership experience.

Drive Fiorano Through the Ferrari Classiche Academy 

Ferrari Classiche Academy is underway. This series of driving courses focuses on various classic cars that helped to create the legend of the Prancing Horse and write the history of their era.

Each course is held over two days at the Fiorano Circuit and enables participants to explore the origins of the Maranello-based company. The drivers will get to know the world of Ferrari Classiche and learn the techniques used to drive cars produced before electronics had entered the automotive world.

Ferrari Classiche Academy is divided into different track driving modules. These modules give everyone, including people new to historic cars, the chance to familiarize themselves with the vehicle dynamics, the gearbox, corner management and many other aspects of driving these cars.

The program begins with a practical introduction to the cars covered by the course (four 308 GTS and GTBi models, all with various mechanical developments from the base models, and a Mondial 3.2). The cars are analyzed on the lift to give an idea of the components used and their technical characteristics.

Afterwards, on a guided tour of the Officine Classiche Ferrari and the company’s technical archive, participants can view technical drawings, engineers’ notebooks and race reports for GT and racing cars produced from 1947 onwards.

The subsequent track sessions consist of a series of technical briefings by the instructors on driving techniques for cars with manual gearbox without electronic assistance, including ‘heel and toe’, ‘double clutching’ and others.

Once behind the wheel of a historic car, the participants (always accompanied by their instructors) perform a series of driving sessions of increasing difficulty. These take place in a wide range of conditions, including driving in the wet, counter-steering at speed and managing vehicle dynamics. The module on driving techniques for regularity racing is also of great interest. These competitions are popular with many fans of classic cars.

The second round of Ferrari Classiche Academy courses will start next spring.

Huracán Surpasses Gallardo Production in Half the Time

In just 5 years of production Lamborghini Huracán number 14,022 rolls off the assembly line, marking a production milestone for the V10 model of Lamborghini: the Gallardo, the previous Lamborghini V10 model, was produced in a total of 14,022 units over a production cycle of ten years (2003-2013).

The V10 Huracán family, successor to the iconic Gallardo, made its world debut in 2014 with the coupé version, followed by the Spyder and the rear-wheel-drive versions: the Performante in 2017 and the Performante Spyder in 2018 proved their performance capabilities, holding several lap records. In 2019 the new Huracán EVO (coupe & Spyder) was introduced, featuring a next generation V10 engine and incorporating vehicle dynamic control and aerodynamics.

The commemorative model with chassis number 14,022, a Huracán EVO coupé in Grigio Titans (grey), is destined for the Korean market.

In the first six months of 2019 (from 1 January to 30 June) Automobili Lamborghini has delivered a total of 4.553 cars to clients: an increase of 96% compared to the same period last year.

The Huracán accounted for 1,211 units, including deliveries during the Huracán Performante’s phase-out period and introduction of the new Huracán EVO, of which first customer deliveries started in June 2019. The Aventador, the V12 brand icon headed by the SVJ model, maintained its high levels, with 649 units delivered to customers.

Novitec Ferrari 812 Superfast N-Largo

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Alex Bernstein || IG