Category: british

First Look: The New McLaren 720S SpiderMcLaren Automotive, the…

First Look: The New McLaren 720S Spider

McLaren Automotive, the British manufacturer of luxury, high-performance sportscars and supercars, is expanding its Super Series product family with the introduction of a second new model under the £1.2bn Track25 business plan and its most accomplished convertible supercar ever: the new 720S Spider.

The design foundations of the new McLaren Spider are the seamless and organic forms introduced in 2017 with the 720S Coupé.  Combining to maximize downforce, minimize drag, enhance powertrain cooling and optimize aerodynamic performance, these shapes produce an overall appearance akin to a futuristic sculpture, formed by the air that flows over, under, around and through it.  A new, electrically actuated Retractable Hard Top (RHT) is seamlessly integrated into the design, as are new buttresses.

Ferocious acceleration; 202mph with the roof down…

The 4.0-liter twin-turbocharged McLaren V8 engine that powers the 720S Spider is unchanged from the Coupé.  Mid-mounted for exceptional handling and purity of response, it produces 720PS and 770Nm and –given the lightest-in-class weight of the 720S Spider and resulting power-to-weight ratio of 540PS-per-tonne at lightest dry weight – it is no surprise that performance is extreme.

Acceleration is nothing short of phenomenal, with 0-100km/h (0-62mph) covered in 2.9 seconds and 0-200km/h (0-124mph) achieved in just 7.9 seconds – just 0.1 seconds off the pace of the Coupé.  The standing quarter mile sprint is dispatched in 10.4 seconds – again, only 0.1 seconds slower than the Coupé – and where conditions allow, the 720S Spider will continue accelerating to a Coupé-matching top speed of 341km/h (212mph) with the roof raised.  Even with the roof lowered, maximum speed remains extraordinary at 325km/h (202mph).  The minor variations in performance arise from differing aerodynamics and the additional 49kg the Spider carries.

McLaren MP4-12C ‘Project Alpha’ EditionImage by Max…

McLaren MP4-12C ‘Project Alpha’ Edition

Image by

Max Chiu || IG

McLaren 720SImages by Jang Heoun Ryu || IG

McLaren 720S

Images by

Jang Heoun Ryu || IG

Aston Martin DB11Image by Igor Panitz || IG

Aston Martin DB11

Image by

Igor Panitz || IG

Aston Martin DBS SuperleggeraImage by CJE.Photo

Aston Martin DBS Superleggera

Image by

CJE.Photo

First Look: The McLaren Special Operations 720S ‘Stealth’…

First Look: The McLaren Special Operations 720S ‘Stealth’ Theme

Don’t be fooled by the name: The MSO 720S Stealth Theme from McLaren Special Operations will ensure that one McLaren 720S owner stands out from the crowd even more than usual, in a striking car produced as a bespoke order for McLaren retailer, McLaren London.

The McLaren 720S can be ordered as standard in one of three specification levels, with MSO Defined options among the additional features offered to customers who want their new car to be unlike others. Beyond this there are opportunities to further personalize a McLaren through MSO’s Bespoke services, where areas such as paint and interior stitching can be developed as themes to create a car that is often, quite literally, one-of-a-kind.

‘Stealth’ was one of the MSO Bespoke themes visualized for the McLaren 720S on its global debut at the 2017 Geneva International Motor Show; examples of the Velocity, Track and Pacific themes have already been produced as MSO Bespoke orders.

The MSO 720S Stealth Theme was commissioned by McLaren London to be visually even more purposeful than a standard 720S in Performance specification. The scope of the Stealth theme encompasses MSO Defined Sarthe Grey exterior paint – a color inspired by the McLaren F1 GTR that was victorious at the famous Le Mans Circuit de la Sarthe in 1995 – and Vermillion Red contrast paint to accentuate the lines of the 720S body. The red detailing – on the front of the car and the bonnet and extending back along the bodysides to the rear deck – was hand-painted by master craftsmen and craftswomen at McLaren Special Operations in a near-200-hour process.

The theme of red accents is continued on the 10-Spoke Super Lightweight alloy wheels, which are finished in MSO Bespoke Satin Black with the outer rim and a single spoke in contrasting Vermillion Red. MSO Bespoke Satin Finish Visual Carbon Fiber components enhance the exterior of the car, with the Front Air Intakes, Door Mirror Casings, Door Mirror Arms, Rear Aero Bridges, Rear Deck and Service Cover and Rear Fender Air Intakes all in the lightweight material.

McLaren 720S Performance specification provides a sports-oriented interior with carbon fiber switch and center panel surrounds and Alcantara® trim material. In the case of this car, MSO Bespoke additions further develop the purposeful theme, with red leather and Apex Red stitching on the fascia, door inners and seats.

Lotus Espirit (Series 3) Image by Matthew Jones || Bē

Lotus Espirit (Series 3)

Image by Matthew Jones ||

The McLaren Speedtail Attribute Prototype “Albert”The first…

The McLaren Speedtail Attribute Prototype “Albert”

The first hybrid powertrain prototype of McLaren Automotive’s new Ultimate Series flagship, the McLaren Speedtail, officially embarks this week on a year-long test regime that will underpin the development of the first McLaren Hyper-GT. The punishing test program in the run-up to production commencing at the end of 2019 will see Speedtail prototypes running in Europe, North America and Africa, initially at automotive test facilities but later with traffic on normal roads.

Deployment of the first Speedtail attribute prototype marks an exciting new stage in the development of the fastest, most aerodynamic and most luxurious McLaren ever made. The prototype is officially designated MVY02 but echoing the naming of development test mules of its legendary forebear, the 1992 McLaren F1, it has been christened, ‘Albert’. This is a respectful reflection not only on the name of the McLaren F1 mule ‘Albert’ but also the Albert Drive premises in which the F1 was designed.

Distinguished by a unique testing livery, ‘Albert’ has a production-specification chassis and petrol-electric hybrid drivetrain, as well as the unique three-seat cockpit with central driving position. As the development and validation program progresses every aspect of the Speedtail’s performance will be honed as the full 1,050PS available to Speedtail drivers to propel the prototype to 403km/h (250mph) is used – including in high-speed trials with McLaren Automotive Chief Test Driver and former IndyCar champion Kenny Bräck at the wheel.

“The start of real-world testing represents a major step in the development of the McLaren Speedtail. As the first fully representative prototype, ‘Albert’ will build on the invaluable work still being put in by earlier development cars, allowing us to sign-off vehicle attributes including chassis dynamics; brake performance; damper tuning; tyres; NVH and aspects of ergonomics and comfort. With a huge amount achieved already, the McLaren Speedtail is well on the way to fulfilling its destiny as the greatest McLaren road car ever.”
Ben Gulliver, Head of Vehicle Development, McLaren Automotive

The central driving position and three-seat layout of the Speedtail was pioneered by the iconic McLaren F1 in 1992. This configuration is uniquely McLaren, remaining exclusive among production cars until McLaren Automotive confirmed in November 2016 that it would be reprised for the next Ultimate Series model, then codenamed BP23.

The centre-seat layout of the Speedtail was first publicly demonstrated in a ‘proof of concept’ model that was simply a McLaren 720S reconfigured with a single, centrally-mounted driving seat. Four further mules followed and these will continue to be used around the world for performance and durability testing, alongside the prototype vehicles.

Despite its test livery and the bodywork from the A-pillars forward, ‘Albert’ is fundamentally a Speedtail, with shape-representative body panels and dihedral doors around the unique carbon fiber McLaren Monocage core structure. The production-level specification allows Speedtail attributes to be proven in real-world conditions early in the development process, including for example ingress and egress to the three-seat cockpit.

Production of the £1.75 million (plus local taxes) McLaren Speedtail is due to commence at the end of 2019, with first deliveries in early 2020. As with the McLaren F1, 106 cars will be available and all have already now been allocated to owners.

The McLaren Speedtail Attribute Prototype “Albert”The first…

The McLaren Speedtail Attribute Prototype “Albert”

The first hybrid powertrain prototype of McLaren Automotive’s new Ultimate Series flagship, the McLaren Speedtail, officially embarks this week on a year-long test regime that will underpin the development of the first McLaren Hyper-GT. The punishing test program in the run-up to production commencing at the end of 2019 will see Speedtail prototypes running in Europe, North America and Africa, initially at automotive test facilities but later with traffic on normal roads.

Deployment of the first Speedtail attribute prototype marks an exciting new stage in the development of the fastest, most aerodynamic and most luxurious McLaren ever made. The prototype is officially designated MVY02 but echoing the naming of development test mules of its legendary forebear, the 1992 McLaren F1, it has been christened, ‘Albert’. This is a respectful reflection not only on the name of the McLaren F1 mule ‘Albert’ but also the Albert Drive premises in which the F1 was designed.

Distinguished by a unique testing livery, ‘Albert’ has a production-specification chassis and petrol-electric hybrid drivetrain, as well as the unique three-seat cockpit with central driving position. As the development and validation program progresses every aspect of the Speedtail’s performance will be honed as the full 1,050PS available to Speedtail drivers to propel the prototype to 403km/h (250mph) is used – including in high-speed trials with McLaren Automotive Chief Test Driver and former IndyCar champion Kenny Bräck at the wheel.

“The start of real-world testing represents a major step in the development of the McLaren Speedtail. As the first fully representative prototype, ‘Albert’ will build on the invaluable work still being put in by earlier development cars, allowing us to sign-off vehicle attributes including chassis dynamics; brake performance; damper tuning; tyres; NVH and aspects of ergonomics and comfort. With a huge amount achieved already, the McLaren Speedtail is well on the way to fulfilling its destiny as the greatest McLaren road car ever.”
Ben Gulliver, Head of Vehicle Development, McLaren Automotive

The central driving position and three-seat layout of the Speedtail was pioneered by the iconic McLaren F1 in 1992. This configuration is uniquely McLaren, remaining exclusive among production cars until McLaren Automotive confirmed in November 2016 that it would be reprised for the next Ultimate Series model, then codenamed BP23.

The centre-seat layout of the Speedtail was first publicly demonstrated in a ‘proof of concept’ model that was simply a McLaren 720S reconfigured with a single, centrally-mounted driving seat. Four further mules followed and these will continue to be used around the world for performance and durability testing, alongside the prototype vehicles.

Despite its test livery and the bodywork from the A-pillars forward, ‘Albert’ is fundamentally a Speedtail, with shape-representative body panels and dihedral doors around the unique carbon fiber McLaren Monocage core structure. The production-level specification allows Speedtail attributes to be proven in real-world conditions early in the development process, including for example ingress and egress to the three-seat cockpit.

Production of the £1.75 million (plus local taxes) McLaren Speedtail is due to commence at the end of 2019, with first deliveries in early 2020. As with the McLaren F1, 106 cars will be available and all have already now been allocated to owners.

Starring: ‘62 Jaguar MK2By Paul Shawcross

Starring: ‘62 Jaguar MK2

By Paul Shawcross